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Published Articles


Practice Tips: Closing Argument in Ryan Hill v. Northwestern Memorial Hospital - A Birth Injury Case

ITLA TRIAL JOURNAL | JANUARY 1ST, 2014 | BY CHRISTOPHER T. HURLEY

As with many cases that get tried, we had our share of problems in Hill v. Northwestern. But sometimes the defense is so focused on the problems with the plaintiff's case--i.e., causation--that they overlook their own problems.

In this article Chris Hurley explores the strengths and weakness of the case, how he prepared for trial, and his uniquely compelling closing argument, resulting in a verdict for the injured child for more than $14,000,000.


Wrongful Birth: Plaintiffs Can Recover for Emotional Distress

ILLINOIS BAR JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 1ST, 2013 | BY CHRISTOPHER T. HURLEY AND MARK R. MCKENNA

With the rapid growth of prenatal genetic testing, courts are increasingly faced with complex issues arising from claims of negligent genetic counseling. In its 1987 decision in Siemieniec v. Lutheran General Hospital, the Illinois Supreme Court first recognized parental tort claims for wrongful birth when negligent genetic counseling results in the birth of a disabled child.

Recently in Clark v. Children's Memorial Hospital, the Illinois Supreme Court clarified that damages available to parents who pursue a wrongful birth claim include both the extraordinary expenses of care for the disabled child until his or her majority, as well as compensation for the parents own emotional distress.


Child Sexual Abuse by Clergy: Statute of Limitations and Repose Challenges

ILLINOIS BAR JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 1ST, 2012 | BY CHRISTOPHER T. HURLEY AND MARK R. MCKENNA

The 2011 Illinois Appellate Court's decision in Wisniewski v. Diocese of Belleville holds that a Catholic diocese's fraudulent concealment of abuse by its priest tolls the statutes of limitation and repose, allowing a now middle-aged victim to collect against the diocese. This continued a trend by the Illinois legislature toward allowing victims of clergy sex abuse access to court.

Previously, many lawyers would have turned away these victims because their claims are based on sexual abuse from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s and thus time-barred by statutes of limitation and repose. This article looks at the decision and the law governing clergy abuse litigation.


Risk Takers: Leaving the Big Firm Life

LAW PRACTICE MANAGEMENT | JUNE 1ST, 2002 | BY CHRISTOPHER T. HURLEY

Ten years ago, I left the security and comfort of a large firm job at Baker & McKenzie to start my own plaintiff's personal injury firm. I was 31 years old, and my wife and I had three kids in diapers and an insignificant amount of capital in the bank.

Having all the amenities of big firm life and a growing family, what compelled me to take a leap of faith and fly solo? There was nothing especially wrong with my practice situation at that time. Rather, I was motivated by visions of my future – and my desire to control it.


Plaintiff Lawyer's Perspective on Contingency Fees

YOUNG LAWYERS SECTION JOURNAL | OCTOBER 1ST, 1994 | BY CHRISTOPHER T. HURLEY

The recent publicity arising out of the McDonald's coffee case and the airline disaster in Pittsburgh seems to have given new life to opponents of contingency fees for compensating plaintiffs' lawyers. In fact, YLS Co-Editor Jackson Williams (YLS Editor's Column; "Is It Time to Rethink Contingency Fees?" CBA Record, Sept. 1994) argued that in certain cases such fees are too high. This argument is particularly popular with the insurance and health care industries.

However, there are a number of sound reasons why contingency fees have been an essential ingredient in our civil justice system for over 100 years. I devote my practice to the representation of injured people, but I spent four years at Baker & McKenzie representing corporate defendants and insurance companies. With that perspective I would like to explain why the contingency fee system is fair and in the best interest of the public.

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