Contact Us
Blog
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in medical malpractice compensation

Chicago medical malpractice lawyersDoctors may be mere humans, just like the rest of us but, by default, they are held to a higher standard. We expect them to be rational, honest, and moral human beings. This is not irrational or asking too much. We are entrusting them with our lives, our secrets, the parts of us that are vulnerable. Yet there are far too many who are not worthy of that trust. Worse yet, you – their patient – may never know, and that could put you at risk for a medical injury.

Fit to Practice?

Nearly a decade ago, a Missouri doctor was investigated for healthcare fraud. Found guilty and convicted of a felony, he allegedly charged Medicare insurance for one drug but then injected cheaper, still experimental drugs into the eyes of his patients. Sometimes, he reportedly split the single-dose vials between to separate patients and then billed each one for a full dose. In total, this happened at least 284 times, which amounted to about $600,000 in excess charges to the government.

...

Chicago IL medical malpractice attorneysEach year, more than 200,000 patients die from a preventable medical mistake and as many as four million more experience non-fatal errors that can delay treatment, compromise care, or otherwise put the patient at risk for serious injury or illness. And then there are those who experience willfully malicious acts (such as sexual abuse at the hands of their physician) that may or may not affect treatment or diagnosis but can cause great harm. 

Some incidents may be fairly clear-cut, with substantial evidence indicating negligence or medical malpractice. However, many may lack such evidence and, in some cases, the mistake (or its consequence) may not be immediately evident. For example, a patient who has cancer but is misdiagnosed may not learn until long after the fact. Either way, patients should know when and how to file a complaint against their doctor, should the need arise. 

When to File a Complaint 

...

Chicago IL medical malpractice attorneysWhen absolutely necessary, amputations can save lives. Then there are other circumstances - a physician removes the wrong limb, performs an amputation on the wrong patient, or creates the need for amputation by failing to treat a patient in a timely manner.  These situations, along with many others, are considered wrongful amputations. If it has happened to you or someone you love, you may be due compensation. Know your rights and what steps you should take to pursue a claim.

Determining if Your Amputation Was Medically Necessary

Though a part of you was taken, and something feels “off” about the situation, you need evidence of a mistake to pursue a wrongful amputation case. Unfortunately, this can often be difficult to obtain. Even if a nurse, physician, surgeon, or other hospital staff was responsible – maybe by incorrectly inserting an IV catheter, accidentally cutting off circulation to a working limb, or failing to notice a loss of blood flow after a trauma – your amputation may be deemed “medically necessary.” Clues held within your medical records may show otherwise. 

...

Former hematologist and oncologist Farid Fata, of Oakland County, Michigan, is serving 45 years in prison as a result of years of fraud and money-laundering. The doctor has faced lawsuits from 43 patients, and has supposedly administered unnecessary treatment to up to 533 patients from his oncology clinic Michigan Hematology Oncology, P.C. Last September, Fata pleaded guilty or no contest to money laundering, conspiracy to pay and receive kickbacks, and health care fraud; still, these counts fail to fully encapsulate Fata’s misdeeds.

...

right to compensation, Chicago medical malpractice attorneysWhen a doctor, medical staff, hospital, or nursing home is negligent or makes a mistake that causes injury or death to a patient it is called medical malpractice. The patient or patient’s family deserves the maximum compensation for the mistake or negligence. A new provision of a bill recently passed by the House of Representatives would protect the doctors and hospitals instead of the patient and their family.

If signed into law, the provision would put a limit on the amount of compensation victims of medical malpractice would be able to collect. The belief is that limiting the compensation will lower spending in the healthcare system. Texas already has a law that limits compensation to $250,000 per year, but it has not cut spending in the healthcare system. A study showed that spending per patient increased.

This provision does not benefit the patients. It benefits doctors, hospitals, and the healthcare system. It would prohibit the use of federal guidelines for the quality of care standards to be used in medical malpractice cases. This means if the doctor or hospital was negligent or caused you or a family member an injury or death, the quality of care guidelines would not be admissible in court to show the negligence.

...
To Top